Archive for the 'Leading Well' Category

If You are Bullied at Work

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

In the past couple of articles we’ve looked at how to deal with bullying in a team you lead or the workplace where you are in charge.

What about if you are the one being bullied? If your boss, or even a colleague is bullying you, how should you handle that situation?

Just as you need to have no tolerance for bullying within a team you lead, if you are the one being bullied, at some point you will need to stand up for yourself in the face of bullying.

Remember, any bullying or harassment in the workplace is unacceptable and needs to be addressed as soon as possible. Everyone, including you, has a right to feel safe at work and to be treated with respect.

However it is important to resist the urge to try to ‘get back’ at the bully or lower yourself to their tactics in your response.

Exactly how you respond in a situation will depend on the specific context. If you find yourself being publicly bullied or harassed your response may need to be different to a situation where you face secret threats or manipulation.

Either way it is a good idea to prepare yourself before you respond so you can be strong enough to be calm and assertive in your response, no matter how loud and abusive the bully might be. If you become angry and aggressive or ‘fight’ back it will not help in the long term and the bully may even be able to convince others that the problem is all your fault.

So hold your ground. Stay calm. Interrupt a verbal tirade by saying that you both want what’s best. Simply showing that you can be brave in the face of a stream of abuse can help deflect a bully. Often, the bully singles out targets who avoid any conflict since they know that they’ll be more likely to get their way.

A powerful way to interrupt a bully is to say their name. Look into their eyes, speak in a strong clear and firm voice, and repeat their name until they stop talking.

Then take control by asking short questions. Ask short direct clarifying questions and keep asking them until the bully begins to calm down. Don’t get into a discussion, just ask further clarifying questions to show you are trying to really understand what has upset them.

Asking questions can be effective in a variety of different situations, including attacks in front of coworkers, private confrontations or in meetings so it is worthwhile learning this technique.

Concentrate on maintaining a calm appearance – no matter how you are really feeling inside. The louder and more out-of-control the bully is, the calmer you need to appear to be in contrast to them.

Paraphrasing the bully’s responses, deferring the discussion until later when things are more measured or others will be present, even gentle humor – particularly if you can laugh at yourself – can all help to defuse a situation.

However you respond, bullying is serious and needs to be addressed. If you can’t handle it on your own, you need to bring in someone to support you in dealing with it. This can obviously be difficult if the bully is the person you report to. When that is the case you may need to look to other parts of your organization (possibly someone in Human resources or your boss’s boss?) or an external Coach or Mentor to help you to tackle the situation.

At some point you may even decide the bullying is not worth your energy in trying to deal with it and you would rather move on. Should that situation arise, take care to never burn your bridges. If you can’t take any more and can’t get help, you can make your exit but be sure to keep your dignity intact.

If you do decide you must leave your position because of bullying, try to make the decision to leave outside of the emotional realm. When you hand in your notice, do so later, with a cool head, not brimming with rants or fuming about the unfair treatment you got from someone. Remember, you may need those people to vouch for you at some time in the future.

When you do it this way, you get to enjoy a better sense of control. You will reach greater heights of success if you manage to hold your head up high and always maintain your dignity.

Finally if you do find yourself needing to deal with bullying or harassment, make sure you care for yourself, manage your stress levels, maintain a balanced perspective and keep your sense of humor. Take the time to feel good about yourself and stay grateful for what you’ve been blessed with. Remind yourself that as long as you’re doing what’s right, you’ll be fine.

Dealing with a bully can be stressful. For powerful stress management techniques check out the Stress Free Course now at: http://kmginfo.com/go/stressfree – completely free: My gift for you.

How to Respond to Workplace Bullying

Friday, July 16th, 2010

In my previous article we looked at what does and does not constitute bullying or harassment in the workplace. Today I want to look at how you should respond as team leader if it occurs in your workplace.

So how should you tackle bullying if you detect it or suspect it is happening in a team that you are responsible for?

Any bullying or harassment in the workplace is unacceptable and needs to be addressed immediately. Everyone has a right to feel safe at work and to be treated with respect.

You should never ignore bullying or hope it will just go away. If anyone reports, or if you witness or suspect, an incident that could be bullying, you must respond rapidly. Otherwise, your silence is perceived by the perpetrator and others as collusion in what is happening.

If you are in a leadership role, and you observe any indications that bullying or harassment might be occurring, you have a responsibility to stand up and show that you will not tolerate such actions from anyone in your team or elsewhere.

Listen to all team members and encourage them to work together cooperatively on solutions to the real problems they are experiencing. Use individual coaching to help individuals modify their behavior and motivate them to be productive team members. See details about how to do this here: http://kmginfo.com/go/workplace-motivation

Just as some people bring out your best, and other people bring out your worst, you can bring out the best in other people even at their worst. It’s a matter of understanding where they are coming from and what is likely to work with them.

As with most team-related issues, the best way to address a bullying problem will depend on the specific situation, but a sound first step is usually to begin a conversation around the behaviors you have observed, compared to what you expect.

Facilitate an open conversation with your team members about team values like trust, respect and how they relate to working together in a team. This can be a powerful and helpful start to addressing the situation.

By securing team agreement about how your team members will treat each other going forward, you will both minimize the likelihood of the situation being repeated and ensure that in future no one can say they didn’t know bullying or harassing actions might be unacceptable.

Take particular care not to allow the bullying victim to be targeted personally during your discussions. Focus on acceptable and unacceptable actions and behaviors, not on individuals, personalities, or character traits. Stay calm but make it quite clear, as firmly and often as seems to be required, that bullying or harassment are not acceptable in any circumstances and will not be tolerated.

If your organization has a formal code of practice or ethics, a corporate values statement or a relevant workplace policy you might discuss how it applies. If such codes or policies do not yet exist, now might be a good time to begin to develop one, at least within your team.

If you don’t feel able to do this, bring in an external facilitator to help you.

Handling such a situation well can even build a stronger team – the sort of team with a positive commitment to positive shared values, that works together to achieve your vision and goals, and that is the hallmark of a good leader.

For details about how to coach individuals to better behavior see here: http://kmginfo.com/go/workplace-motivation

And watch out for my next article where we’ll look at what you can do if you are the one being bullied.

Dealing with Bullying at Work

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

One of the most toxic additions to any workplace is the bully. If you work with (or for) a bully, or one of the people on the team you lead may be a bully it is important to handle the situation carefully yet assertively.

In this series of articles I want to share some tips for how to deal with workplace bullying successfully.

First let’s look at what is bullying or harassment?

A bully abuses any power they have over less powerful people. You will often feel oppressed, humiliated, weak, and belittled after talking to a bully. In addition, you will typically feel worse about yourself. At the same time you may feel obliged to laugh at the comments that are being made about you or to you, even thought they are hurtful or not true.

A bully may be someone who consistently dishes out venomous personal remarks, who takes delight in ruining your day with seemingly harmless yet cutting statements, who takes credit for your work, constantly threatens you with dismissal or demotion, or who is simply rude, aggressive, and pushy. The bully often leaves people feeling threatened and demeaned.

Bullying and harassment might be:

  • physical (being hit, bumped, tripped, pinched),
  • verbal (humiliation, name-calling, teasing, putdowns),
  • psychological (intimidation, sabotage, coercion, manipulation, threats, gestures, being watched or stalked),
  • social (embarrassment, smear campaigns, being ignored or having rumors spread about you)
  • or sexual (physical, verbal or nonverbal sexual conduct).

Bullying and harassment often happens out of sight of other authorities, leaders or managers and is typically repeated over an extended time.

However not everyone who displays these sorts of behaviors is a workplace bully. An isolated incident doesn’t equate to bullying.

Just because someone tells you they don’t like something you did or didn’t do, or you don’t like the way they communicate with you doesn’t make them a bully.

Even if someone yells at you in frustration it doesn’t necessarily mean they are a bully. It may just mean they lack the emotional maturity to express themselves more professionally or they tend to overreact to a stressful situation. Goodhearted people can make mistakes. While issues like these still need to be addressed, they aren’t as corrosive to your workplace culture as bullying or harassment can be.

A bully, on the other hand, intends to intimidate, dominate and disempower and they do it consistently and repeatedly.

The negative effects of bullying and harassment are well known and definitely serious.

Bullying frequently leads to significant effects on work performance, illness, absenteeism and low team morale. In extreme cases post traumatic stress disorder and even suicide have occured.

Bullying can’t be ignored or overlooked. If you are a manager, team leader or business owner, you have at least a moral (and in many places a legal) obligation to ensure your workplace is free from bullying or harassment.

In a few days time we’ll look at how you should tackle bullying when it is happening in your team or workplace…

Meanwhile have a look at some of these Stress and Productivity Resources:

http://kmginfo.com/go/stress-productivity

How to Relieve Stress

Monday, August 10th, 2009
Today I thought I’d share some tips with you to help you celebrate Lifeline’s Stress Down Day. If you find them helpful you might like to make a donation to Lifeline at http://www.stressdown.org.au/ and forward this on to anyone else who may find it helpful.
Stress can have a number of adverse affects on your health, both short-term and long-term.
If you’re experiencing some of the following symptoms, it could indicate that you could benefit from some advice on how to relieve stress before your health suffers any worse than it already has.  Feelings of anger, fear or helplessness are common indicators of stress, as is insomnia.  Stress can cause headaches and pain in the jaw, neck and back.  Habitual smoking, drinking, overeating and drug abuse may also be caused by stress.
Stress is how your body responds to change.  And situations that cause stress in one person may not cause stress in another.  It’s a very individual experience.
One person may become tense when driving over high bridges, while another may enjoy the view.  The thought of skydiving terrifies some people, but others find it thrilling.
It’s nearly impossible to classify any particular situation as stressful, because what causes stress in one person could be a source of enjoyment for the next.  The key is to identify and manage what is stressful for you personally, because letting stress go unmanaged can have life-threatening health consequences.
Things you feel that you have no control over can be upsetting.  But remember it’s not the situation, but how you deal with it that’s important.  You can’t control everything that happens to you, but you can choose how you handle stressful situations.
For practical tools and useful ideas on how to handle stress effectively have a look at my Stress-Free Course at http://stressfreecourse.com/ – my gift to you today at no cost!
Meanwhile, here are some quick tips for relieving your stress:
* Focus on your breathing and breathe slow, deep and deliberately.  Picture a peaceful scene in your mind.
* Exercise regularly.  Exercising releases tension from your body.  Find something you enjoy that gets the major muscle groups going.  Jogging, walking, swimming or bicycling are all excellent choices.
* Count to ten slowly and deliberately.  This helps you to pause and relax before reacting to a stressful situation.
* Do some stretching exercises several times during the day.  Stretching relaxes the muscles and reduces tension.
* Have a friend massage the back of your neck, shoulders and upper back.  These muscles get especially tense when you are stressed.
* Take hot showers and baths.
* Listen to relaxing music.
* Talk to your family and friends about what is causing you stress.
Seek help when you need it.  If you have recurring headaches and neck or upper back pain, and are having problems sleeping, you should see your doctor.
Stress is a normal part of working life, so it is important to learn how to manage it.
Learning how to relieve stress, and putting these methods to use are critical your overall health and happiness.  Try to learn to accept what you can’t change.  Not everything is going to happen the way you want it to – and not everything will turn out to be as bad as we sometimes imagine it might be.  Train yourself to look for the good in what appears to be a bad situation, talk to others about your troubles, and try to mentally remove yourself from the situation then evaluate it from the outside looking in.
For some really practical information on how to manage stress you might like to join my Stress-Free Course at http://stressfreecourse.com/ – my gift to you today absolutely free!
Kind regards
Kerrie
PS  Watch out soon for some big things happening in the Leadership Coaching Club  http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

I recently shared some tips on how to relieve stress with subscribers of my Leading Well newsletter in honour of Lifeline’s Stress Down Day. (If you find them helpful you might like to make a donation to Lifeline at http://www.stressdown.org.au/ and forward this on to anyone else who may find it helpful.)

Stress can have a number of adverse affects on your health, both short-term and long-term.

If you’re experiencing some of the following symptoms, it could indicate that you could benefit from some advice on how to relieve stress before your health suffers any worse than it already has.  Feelings of anger, fear or helplessness are common indicators of stress, as is insomnia.  Stress can cause headaches and pain in the jaw, neck and back.  Habitual smoking, drinking, overeating and drug abuse may also be caused by stress.

Stress is how your body responds to change.  And situations that cause stress in one person may not cause stress in another.  It’s a very individual experience.

One person may become tense when driving over high bridges, while another may enjoy the view.  The thought of skydiving terrifies some people, but others find it thrilling.

It’s nearly impossible to classify any particular situation as stressful, because what causes stress in one person could be a source of enjoyment for the next.  The key is to identify and manage what is stressful for you personally, because letting stress go unmanaged can have life-threatening health consequences.

Things you feel that you have no control over can be upsetting.  But remember it’s not the situation, but how you deal with it that’s important.  You can’t control everything that happens to you, but you can choose how you handle stressful situations.

For practical tools and useful ideas on how to handle stress effectively have a look at my Stress-Free Course at http://stressfreecourse.com/ – my gift to you today at no cost!

Meanwhile, here are some quick tips for relieving your stress:

* Focus on your breathing and breathe slow, deep and deliberately.  Picture a peaceful scene in your mind.

* Exercise regularly.  Exercising releases tension from your body.  Find something you enjoy that gets the major muscle groups going.  Jogging, walking, swimming or bicycling are all excellent choices.

* Count to ten slowly and deliberately.  This helps you to pause and relax before reacting to a stressful situation.

* Do some stretching exercises several times during the day.  Stretching relaxes the muscles and reduces tension.

* Have a friend massage the back of your neck, shoulders and upper back.  These muscles get especially tense when you are stressed.

* Take hot showers and baths.

* Listen to relaxing music.

* Talk to your family and friends about what is causing you stress.

Seek help when you need it.  If you have recurring headaches and neck or upper back pain, and are having problems sleeping, you should see your doctor.

Stress is a normal part of working life, so it is important to learn how to manage it.

Learning how to relieve stress, and putting these methods to use are critical your overall health and happiness.  Try to learn to accept what you can’t change.  Not everything is going to happen the way you want it to – and not everything will turn out to be as bad as we sometimes imagine it might be.  Train yourself to look for the good in what appears to be a bad situation, talk to others about your troubles, and try to mentally remove yourself from the situation then evaluate it from the outside looking in.

For some really practical information on how to manage stress you might like to join my Stress-Free Course at http://stressfreecourse.com/ – my gift to you today absolutely free!

Do you have a favourite tips for relieving stress to share with other readers?  Please share it by posting a comment below.

How do you cope with conflict in the workplace?

Friday, July 10th, 2009

Conflict can make many people feel very uncomfortable. It’s easy to become emotionally invested in the outcome of a conflict and feel personally attacked. For some, conflict in the workplace is an immediate incentive to start looking for another job.

As a leader and manager you can’t avoid conflict. It comes with the territory! And you can’t afford to ignore it or you may lose some of your best people as well as the resources you need to do your job. Nor can you afford to get so involved in the conflict that you become a part of it.

So how do you cope with conflict in the workplace?

In fact your role is to manage through conflict, however uncomfortable it may make you feel.

This means it is critical that you understand your own response to conflict and develop the skills that will allow you to cope effectively with conflict in organisations.

Once you can do that, not only will you cope well with conflict you will even begin to see the positive role conflict can have in an organisation in terms of fairly establishig priorities and access to limited resources.

You’ll find more details on the three essentials for coping with conflict in the Member’s area of the Leadership Coaching Club, so if you are a member, you can login now for more help to develop these critical leadership skills.

Of course if you are not a member of the Leadership Coaching Club yet, you really should consider joining immediately. There is so much practical and helpful information in there that you get instant access to, the minute you join. Not only that but more is being added constantly.

In addition to The Three Essentials For Coping With Conflict, here are just some of the items you will find inside:

How To Say ‘No’ To Your Boss
How To Handle People Who Disagree With You
How To Reduce Meetings That Waste Your Time
10 Ways To Start Taking Control Of Your Time, Your Life And Your Work…
The Easiest Way To Give An Impromptu Speech
Customer Service Training In 3 Quick Steps
Three Quick Stress Busters
What Your Employees Expect Of You
Motivating Staff Explained
How To Turn Problems To Profits
… and much, much more, including all the Core Training Modules, Special Bonuses, Free Resources …

Check it out today at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

Kind regards

Kerrie

PS. That link again for the Leadership Coaching Club and all the help you need to mentor, manage and lead is http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

PPS.  Share how you cope with conflict in the workplace by adding a comment below.

How to get maximum results with minimum effort

Thursday, February 5th, 2009

Maximum Results with Minimum Effort

I guess that’s everyone’s dream. As a leader or manager your responsibility and role is to deliver set outcomes through the efforts of others – those people on your team. 

Your role is not to do the tasks, but to make sure they get done.

And that all sounds fine … until you are faced with an employee whose performance is not up to scratch.

Now you are confronted with the challenge of bringing their performance up to the required standard. And I’ve never met a leader who doesn’t experience at least a little sinking feeling at the
prospect of working through all the difficult issues that can be associated with changing the attitudes and skills of an employee who needs to do better.

If even one member of your team isn’t performing well, your whole team will suffer.

Not only will your team’s results be effected, other team members who are doing their best will become disheartened by the impact of any inadequate contributions and the whole team culture and morale will suffer.

Poor performance by any team member presents a situation you just can’t afford to ignore. It demands your urgent attention – and you had better get whatever you decide to do right, or the problems can just escalate.

So what should you do?

Faced with a poorly performing employee your options are basically to move them on or help them get better.

As the first option is an option of last resort (and one that is not always available anyway) I will focus on how you can help a poorly performing employee get better. When you do this properly, you in effect gain a whole new team member for minimum effort so this is a very powerful option.

You have three primary options available for helping a poorly performing employee reach your required standard of performance:

1. Coaching
2. Training
3. Performance Management

All are valid, but each is best used in somewhat different circumstances.

* Performance Management (or Disciplinary Counselling)

This should be reserved for repeated instances of poor performance and matters of a very serious nature.

If Performance Management fails to produce satisfactory and sustained improvements in performance, the employee needs to understand they will no longer have a role to play in your team.

When you initiate a formal Performance Management process, you should ensure you have the authority and support required to enforce this, should it be required. A discussion with your supervisor and with your Human Resources department will help protect you, should you need to remove someone if their performance doesn’t improve.

* Training is an often overlooked means of improving performance.

Many people who learn skills and tasks on the job could do things better with even a day or two of formal training.

This is even more so with ’soft’ skills like leadership, communication and management. So watch out for courses and opportunities to expand the skills of all the people on your team.

Two disadvantages with training are that it is often necessary to wait for an appropriate course to become available and courses can be expensive.

* Coaching, on the other hand, is one of your most valuable  leadership tools.

You can use it every day, with good people who could be even better - AND with poor performers who need to improve their skills or attitude. Done well, it needn’t take very long, and it can show huge returns on the little time you invest.

Coaching doesn’t need any formal approval or additional funding and, by it’s very nature, when it is done well it builds team moral and makes employees feel valued and supported.

Of all your three options for performance improvement, coaching has huge potential to deliver maximum results for you with minimum effort. But it has to be done properly.

Once you have developed your own coaching skills you will have a powerful tool in your leadership toolkit. A tool you can apply not only to improve performance in poorly performing employees, but also to boost the performance of your best employees to exceptional results. All with minimum effort for maximum results – and who wouldn’t want that?

For more great ideas on how to improve employee performance through coaching visit: http://kmgsupport.com/PerformanceCoaching

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QUOTE OF NOTE

“Leadership, many have said, is different from management. Management is mostly about ‘to do’ lists – can’t live without them! Leadership is about tapping the wellsprings of human motivation – and about fundamental relations with one’s fellows.”

Tom Peters (American academic)

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How to Improve Employee Performance through Coaching:

Coaching is such a powerful leadership tool for improving employee performance – when it is done well – that I have written a new ‘Just the Gist’ Short Report on exactly how to do it to ensure you get effective results every time.

You will find all the details at:
http://kmgsupport.com/PerformanceCoaching

*** Remember if you are already a member of the Leadership Coaching Club you will get a copy of this, plus a huge range of information, leadership courses, audio programs, ebooks and other resources when you login. (If you aren’t a member yet, you’ll find all the details at: http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/ )

On the other hand if what you want to do is discover how to improve employee performance and boost team morale through effective coaching check out our new Short Report at:

http://kmgsupport.com/PerformanceCoaching

Kind regards

Kerrie

PS. We have a whole lot of things lined up to share with you this year. We hope you will be as excited about them as we are. Watch out for more details soon…

But for now check out How to Improve Employee Performance through Coaching and let us know what you think. That link again:
http://kmgsupport.com/PerformanceCoaching

Do you work with younger staff?

Monday, September 8th, 2008

One of the most requested items from a recent survey I ran was for more information on how to motivate and manage Generation X and Y workers. So if that is one of your concerns as a leader and manager, you’ll be pleased to know we will be publishing something on that very soon.

As always, our aim is to produce practical and to-the-point quick action guides, rather than comprehensive tomes that no one has time to read. But I still want to ensure we cover everything YOU want.

So please do me a quick favor and take two minutes now to to tell me exactly what you want to know and I’ll make sure we include it.

All you need to do is reply to this email and let me know things like:
* what challenges you have working with Generation X and Y workers, and
* what you would like included…

If you would also like to share what you find works best or why you need to know about this topic that would be fine too.

Your reply doesn’t need to be long. Just a quick comment will help and then I can be sure you get the most helpful and useful guide we can produce.

Please take a moment now and tell me exactly what you want to know about managing and motivating Generation X and Y workers.

Thanks in advance.

Kind regards

Kerrie

PS. Members of the Leadership Coaching Club have recently been discovering things like:
• The Five Fundamental Ways to Please Your Boss
• What Everybody Ought to Know About How to Be Stress Free
• Management Leadership – How to Turn Problems to Profits
• The 4 Hour Work Week
• Achieving Great Results … and more
If you’re not a member yet you can join now at: http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

The secret to less stress … free for you!

Friday, August 22nd, 2008

Today I want to look at one of the key challenges I hear about, from Leaders and Managers, all the time.Whether I am speaking at a conference, consulting to organizations or coaching leaders, either one-on-one or through the Leadership Coaching Club, what I hear about is – Stress!

Stress is a huge part of the life of every manager and leader and how well you manage stress has a dramatic impact on your own life, your family’s happiness and the success of your team.

When you can manage stress effectively, not only will you enjoy your life and your role more, you will be able to ‘take charge’ and lead people through situations that others find distressing or even confronting.

If you can’t cope with the stress, you will struggle to do your job at all, let alone well.

Because it is such a huge issue for so many people I have put together the ‘Be Stress Free’ course to share with you how to get stress under control in your life.

It’s packed with useful ideas, practical tips, bonus ebooks and other resources to help you break free from the tyranny of stress.

It really is $97 in value – and I may well start to charge that for it soon – but if you sign up today it will always remain free for you.

Grab it here now, before I change my mind: http://stressfreecourse.com

= = = = =

If you want more personal assistance than a course, you should consider the Leadership Coaching Club where you will find substantial assistance to manage all aspects of your role as a leader. http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

If you are already a member, don’t forget to visit to see all the new material that has been added recently. Here are some of them:

  • The Four Hour Work Week
  • Achieving Great Results
  • Quick and Easy Tips for Reducing Stress
  • Becoming and Innovator
  • Involving People in Change… and much more…

If you are a member you can login in to the Leadership Coaching Club at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/members/ using your email address and member’s password.

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PRIVATE COACHING

And finally, I currently have a couple of openings for private one-on-one coaching.

I only ever work with a very small number of senior and high potential candidates at any one time, and rarely promote my Executive and Leadership Coaching Services, as the limited places tend to fill up automatically from the waiting list or through requests for me to work with someone else in the same organization.

But, as people finish the programs we design, vacancies can arise and currently I can accept a couple more people. So if you would like to work with me personally, one-on-one in my private leadership coaching program, you might like to Contact Us asking for more details.

Coaching is typically done by phone or Skype, with email and state-of-the-art online facilities for support, making it available to candidates located in a wide range of locations.

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That’s all for now, but don’t forget to claim your copy of the “Be Stress Free” course now at http://stressfreecourse.com and Contact Us for more details about my private coaching if you are interested.

Are Your Goals Effective?

Monday, July 21st, 2008

Over the next few weeks we will hear a lot of elite athletes talk about the goals they set for themselves and how they worked to achieve them during the Olympics.

In this issue of Leading Well I want to remind you of the power of goals and how much more we can achieve when we set effective goals.

If you are already a member of the Leadership Coaching Club there is a full program to assist you to set and achieve your goals, both at work and at home. Check it out if you haven’t already done so. You can login in to the Leadership Coaching Club at
http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/members/
using your email address and password – or you can join now at
http://leadershipcoachingclub.com

Kind regards, Kerrie

———–

SETTING YOUR GOALS

The fundamental skill of setting a goal is an open secret known by top-caliber athletes, successful businessmen and businesswomen and all the top achievers in every different field.

Setting effective goals gives you short-term and long-term motivation and focus. Goals help you focus on the acquisition of any required knowledge and they help you to plan and organize your resources and your time so that you can get the best out of your life.

Goals are so effective that many organizations require managers and team leaders to set them. Yet many of us still don’t use them to their full potential.

Setting clearly defined short term and long term goals will enable you to measure your progress and achieve personal satisfaction once you have successfully met your goals.

Charting your progress will also enable you to actually see the stages of completion leading to the actual realization of your goals. This eliminates the feeling of a long and pointless grind towards achieving your goal. Your self-confidence and level of competence will also improve as you will be more aware of your capabilities as you complete or achieve your goals. The basics of goal settings will involve deciding what you really want to do with your personal and professional life and what short term and long term goals you need to achieve it. Then you have to break down goals into the smaller and manageable targets that you must complete on your way to achieving your lifetime targets.

Here are seven pointers that should be taken into consideration in setting your goals and achieving them:

Your Attitude

Attitude plays a very big role in setting and achieving your goals. You must ask yourself if any part of your attitude or your mind is holding you back from completing your simplest goals? If there are any parts of your behavior that are being a hindrance to achieving your goals this can cast your plans into disarray. If you do have problems in these areas then the immediate thing to do is to address your attitude.

Manage Your Time

Careers are made by good time management practice. A stalling career is often attributed to bad time management. Successful careers can require a lot of discipline from an individual in how you manage your time, so plan how far you want to go into your career and manage your time to ensure you do what is needed when it is required.

Invest in Yourself

Education is key in achieving your goals. If your goals require you to have a certain kind of degree or require a certain specialization or demand a certain skill to be developed, make plans and take action to get the appropriate education.

Your family

Your family should never be left out of your plans. If you are just starting out then you have to decide what relationships are important to you, if you want to be a parent or when you want to be a parent.

Money

Personal financial situations also play a major role in achieving your goals. Have a realistic goal on how much you really want to earn and what you will have to invest to achieve it. You also must be able to create plans or stages by which you will be able to reach your earning potential.

Sports goals

Physically gifted individuals may be able to achieve sports related goals like playing in the elite Basketball, Tennis or Football association. Determining your physical capabilities should be one of your priorities. Physical limitations may however be conquered with proper planning and training.

Fun goals

As the saying goes – ‘All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy’ – and this is very true, for hard-working Jills as well as Jacks. Giving yourself a little pleasure should be included into your
plans.

More on how to set effective goals in the Quick Tips below:

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QUOTE OF NOTE

“There are two things to aim at in life; first, to get what you want; and after that, to enjoy it.”

Logan Pearsall Smith (1865-1946)

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The Leading Well Bottom Line:

You don’t have to do it all on your own. Join us in the Leadership Coaching Club and leverage off all the wisdom, insight and experience of dozens of guest experts, other participants and your mentor Kerrie Mullins-Gunst. See http://leadershipcoachingclub.com for details.

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QUICK TIPS FOR SETTING GOALS

* To start achieving your lifetime goals, set a quarter of a century plan, then break it down to five 5 year plans then break the next five years down again to 1 year plans, then 6 month plans then monthly plans, then weekly, then daily.

* Then create a things-to-do list for the day.

* Always review your plans and prepare for contingencies.

The basics of goal settings should not be so difficult once you get to be familiar with them.

* The Core Training Modules in the Leadership Coaching Club http://leadershipcoachingclub.com take you through a proven process for setting your direction, articulating effective goals and then taking the actions that ensure you achieve them. Join today and tap the power of setting goals that work for you in your personal as well as in your professional life.

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“I started with the Leadership Coaching Club when it first became available. My initial reaction was that there was some work that needed to be done. After getting into some of the material however, I’m impressed with the content. It’s practical, useful information that should serve as the foundation of anyone who strives to take on he mantel of leadership. Thank you for your efforts and please continue!”

John Stefanski

Join now

Do People Listen to You?

Thursday, June 19th, 2008

In this issue of Leading Well we look at why it can be so hard to get some of those messages across to your team that should be really obvious, and what you can do about it…

Have you ever asked yourself… WHY DON’T PEOPLE JUST LISTEN?

Some things are so obvious you would think people wouldn’t even need to be told them. Or at least you should be able to tell them once and they ‘get it’ immediately!

Of course if you manage people or lead a team you know this is rarely the case… Take wearing their safety equipment in hazardous workplaces. Or taking stretch breaks for keyboard operators… Or lifting things properly… Or finishing one file before starting on the next… Or keeping the tea-room clean… Or whatever that annoying issue is for you…

Not every message you need to get across as a team leader or manager is a big picture or strategic vision one. Not all could be described as inspiring.

Some messages are not even very exciting or interesting ones.

And some are downright obvious.

But even the obvious messages can still be very important.

And as team leader you need to do what ever it takes to make sure everyone acts on any important messages you need to deliver. You are the one who will be held accountable for their mistakes if they don’t do the right thing, after all.

There are four things you need to remember when you are trying to get even obvious messages to stick… Find out what they are at:
http://leadershipskillcenter.com/products/gymacross.html

WHAT’S NEW IN THE Leadership Coaching Club

Recent articles added include:
* Ten top tips for motivating and inspiring through effective
listening
* Why do people resist change
* Making meetings work – and much much more…

Join at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com or login if you are already a member for details.

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QUOTE OF NOTE

“Meetings are indispensable when you don’t want to do anything.”

John Kenneth Galbraith

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The Leading Well Bottom Line:

You don’t have to do it all on your own. Join us in the Leadership Coaching Club and leverage off all the wisdom, insight and experience of dozens of guest experts, other participants and your mentor Kerrie Mullins-Gunst. See http://leadershipcoachingclub.com for details.

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That link again for the four things you need to remember when you are trying to get your messages to stick… READ MORE at
http://leadershipskillcenter.com/products/gymacross.html

Kind regards, Kerrie

Does your team despise that you do this?

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008

First a huge ‘Thank You’ to everyone who has emailed, called, sent a card or posted a note on the Leadership Coaching Club blog with well wishes for my 15th business birthday. It has meant a lot to hear from you all, including so many I haven’t met face-to-face (yet).

Second – it’s not too late to join the party! The celebrations continue until the end of this month. Enter the competition for complimentary membership now at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/free and join before the end of the month at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com – for a huge discount!

Third, if you have already joined the Leadership Coaching Club there has been quite a lot of new material added recently, including more ebooks, audios, videos and articles, so make sure you login and collect it all. You can login at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/members/ using your email address and password.

Kind regards, Kerrie

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HABITS EVERY TEAM MEMBER ABSOLUTELY HATES IN A LEADER

There are a couple of habits leaders can have that drive team members absolutely crazy.

In this issue of Leading Well I want to look at one of the top two: Micromanagement.

You cannot grow as a leader until you learn to delegate effectively. Delegating means giving away control even though you retain responsibility, which can be daunting at first.

However, as a leader, there is no way you can do everything that needs to be done personally, so you must develop a positive attitude to delegation – and the skills you need to do it effectively.

Your role as a leader is to ensure your people have all the skills, resources and understanding they need to do a task, and then to let them do it. For some leaders that’s the hard bit: letting others get on with doing it!

Don’t micromanage.

Delegating tasks to people makes them feel trusted, wanted and responsible. Good workers like to be given responsibility.

Communicate your objectives and your vision and make them passionate about making it happen!

Guide your people, empower them, and instill confidence in them and they will become your strongest supporters.

More on how to avoid micromanagement and other habits your team leaders hate in the Quick Tips below:

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QUOTE OF NOTE

“The ‘sage on stage’ mode of teaching is being replaced by a new model: ‘the guide on the side’. “

Art Weinstein (American academic)

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The Leading Well Bottom Line:

You can have your own ‘guide on the side’. Join us in the Leadership Coaching Club and leverage off all the wisdom, insight and experience of dozens of guest experts, other participants and your mentor Kerrie Mullins-Gunst. See http://leadershipcoachingclub.com for details.

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QUICK TIPS FOR AVOIDING MICROMANAGEMENT:

  • You can become more comfortable with delegating to your team members by being selective about what tasks you assign, particularly initially.
  • As you delegate more complex tasks, arrange for regular progress meetings to ensure everything is going smoothly. If you make this an expectation up front – and don’t offer advice unless it is requested – the progress meetings will be focussed on coaching and encouragement rather than micromanaging.

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PS. You can find out what the other main habit is that drives team members crazy, at the Leadership Coaching Club. Join before the end of the month at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com for special rates.

Weakness and Leadership

Wednesday, March 5th, 2008

“What does weakness have to do with leadership?” I can hear you ask. 

Well, the answer is quite a lot!  

You see we all have weaknesses, even exceptional leaders.  So as a good leader you need to know your own weaknesses so you can deliberately overcome them.  

We will always have gaps in our knowledge or experience, our understanding of another culture or even our customer’s reality.  We will always have better skills in some areas than others.  Sometimes the very habits or attitudes that have allowed us to succeed in one situation can become a weakness in a different situation.  

Have you given thought to what your personal weaknesses might be?

When we interview an applicant for a new position we often ask them what they consider to be their greatest weakness.  Someone who has considered the question and has a reflective answer that explains how they have overcome it, is likely to be a good employee.   

Similarly, as a leader you need to consider what your weaknesses might be in different situations and how you might overcome them.  

If you have been appointed to a new leadership role, it may be that the skills that won you your promotion are no longer enough for you to succeed in your new role.  You may need to develop a whole new set of leadership and management skills.  

If you are good at some things but have other things that you only do under sufferance, you may neglect the tasks you don’t like when you get busy – unless you ensure someone else on your team has responsibility for them.  

If you are male you will want to ensure that you appoint some women on your leadership team to understand their perspective. If you are selling to people from a different culture you will want to go out of your way to listen to your customers, respect their perspective and include people who share their culture in your team.  

Diversity of background, culture, skills, attitudes and experience in your team will overcome many leadership weaknesses if you value and respect everyone’s input and their strengths.  

As soon as we accept that everyone – even an outstanding leader or manager – has weaknesses, we can begin to look for the strengths that compensate.  

Exceptional leaders recognize and work on their own weaknesses, and they ensure that someone on their team has the strengths that compensate.  

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More on how to address weaknesses in the Quick Tips below:

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QUOTE OF NOTE

“Leaders are learners.  They learn from their failures as well as their successes.” James M Kouzes and Barry Z Posner, 1995

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The Leading Well Bottom Line:  

You don’t have to do it all on your own.  Join us in the Leadership Coaching Club and leverage off all the wisdom, insight and experience of dozens of guest experts, other participants and your mentor Kerrie Mullins-Gunst. See http://leadershipcoachingclub.com for details. 

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QUICK TIPS FOR ADDRESSING WEAKNESSES

*   The important thing is not to torture yourself (or anyone else) over weaknesses, but to work out how to address them.  A weakness only becomes a problem if it isn’t addressed.  

*  Weaknesses are often the flip side of our strengths.  So a highly productive creative worker who works best with a ‘Do not disturb’ sign, may never be good at training someone else or talking to your customers. If you force them to do it, you may lose your productive worker and still not gain a good trainer or customer service person.  

*  Even though we can do something, it doesn’t mean we will enjoy it.  When we get busy or face pressure from change or deadlines, we naturally put off the things we like doing least.  Unless we have recognized this weakness already, and worked out how to compensate, a small weakness can quickly become a major problem.   

* Acknowledging our own weaknesses and encouraging others to do the same can help avoid weaknesses becoming problems.  

While the kittens sleep…

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2008

Hi there and welcome back for another year.  

If you’ve been lucky enough to have had holidays we hope you feel refreshed and ready for all of the exciting things we have planned for you this year.  We’re determined to make sure 2008 is just great!

Since the last issue of Leading Well our family has had two new additions … kittens called Smokey and Izzy who are (for the moment anyway) curled up asleep and looking adorable just beside the chaos they created moments ago when they were playing with anything in reach.  The brief moment of peace and quiet gives me a chance to let you know about two important things that really can’t wait:

First

The Leadership Coaching Club is just about ready to launch and if you are at all interested in joining, you really must make sure your name is on the advance notification list so you get to hear first when it is launched.  This is the only way you will be able to take advantage of the early-bird special offers.  There’s no obligation, and I’m sure you will regret it if you miss out.  Register here:  http://leadershipcoachingclub.com/

Setting up the Leadership Coaching Club has been a lot of work, but I have to say it is looking great and I think you will be really pleased with the way it helps you each month to become even more effective as a leader and manager.  

Second

As well as finalizing the Leadership Coaching Club, we have been hard at work on several other projects that I can’t wait to share with you over the next few weeks.  

And one of them is ready for you right now …

We appreciate that not everyone learns in the same way.  Some people like to read to understand information – and that’s how much leadership information is presented.  However, other people prefer to learn by listening or watching.  So we wanted to help those of you who prefer to learn about leadership and management in this way by offering you some useful videos.  

But not just one or two leadership videos!  

We have drawn together the largest collection of leadership and management videos from all over the internet and added it to the Leadership Skill Center so you can access them easily all in one place at any time.  

It’s an amazing collection, with contributions from a myriad of different sources and freely available for anyone at http://leadershipskillcenter.com/tv right now!  If you can’t find some useful videos here, I’ll be amazed.  

Have a look and let us know what you think.  

Kind regards, Kerrie

PS. Here are those links again: For the Leadership Coaching Club pre-launch registration:   http://leadershipcoachingclub.com 

For the largest collection of leadership and management videos: http://leadershipskillcenter.com/tv 

Xmas news

Saturday, December 22nd, 2007

It’s a busy time of year, and it’s hard not to wonder where the year went!  Here in Australia the days are getting longer and hotter, summer holidays are looming and Santa is struggling to stay cool in his fur trimmed outfit.  It’s hard to believe there have been record cold snaps in other parts of the world.  

But all that means there are a couple of things I want to say to you.  

First, thank you for allowing me to work with you again this year.  Whether I’ve coached or trained you personally or your whole business team, whether I’ve spoken at your leadership conference or facilitated your strategic planning process, or just visited each month via Leading Well, it’s been a privilege and a pleasure to work with you.  We have some really exciting things planned for 2008, so keep an eye out early in the new year for details.  

Last year we offered you some special gifts to download for Christmas to thank you for being a part of our life and they were very popular.  So once again we have gathered together a selection of special Christmas gifts for you and your family. We have added some to help you celebrate the festive season as well as something to help you get off to a great start in 2008. Please accept these Christmas gifts with our compliments.  You will find them here:  http://www.leadershipskillcenter.com/thankyou/xmas.php 

Soon it will be time to take a break to focus on family, fun and festivity for a little while.  We hope, like us, you can look back at lots of good things achieved in 2007, as well as being excited by everything to come in 2008.  

To start the year in mid-January the Leadership Coaching Club will finally open for membership.  Watch for it.  There will be special offers and bonuses for the first people to join as Foundation members, so watch your email from mid-January.  If you want to be the FIRST to know, make sure you sign up for priority notification at

http://www.leadershipcoachingclub.com That way you won’t miss out on getting in early as soon as it is open.  It’s going to be a great program that anyone who is serious about leading and managing people will want to be a part of, so you won’t want to miss it.  

We also have a whole range of other products and programs planned to help you on your path to easy, effective and effortless leadership, that I can’t wait to share with you next year.  

But for now Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from everyone at KMG Consulting and the Leadership Skill Center.  

…HO…HO…HO…  And I haven’t forgotten … Here’s that link for your special Christmas gifts again:  http://www.leadershipskillcenter.com/thankyou/xmas.php (because we know you’ve been good this year!)

Kind regards, Kerrie

PS.  It’s Christmas!  Of course you can share that link with anyone who would like to download a gift for Christmas.  Here it is again: 

http://www.leadershipskillcenter.com/thankyou/xmas.php 

Doing the Important Stuff

Wednesday, November 14th, 2007

As the year seems to be slipping away I thought it was time to look at the fourth area of leadership focus: Getting Things Done. I hope you enjoy this article on ‘Doing the Important Stuff’.

And remember, the Leadership Coaching Club is coming soon. If you are at all interested in joining after it is open to the public, make sure you register at http://leadershipcoachingclub.com now, so you will be eligible for the very special offers when it is first launched. It will be worth your while!

Kind regards, Kerrie

PS. It’s my birthday later this month so if you read right to the end of this issue of Leading Well, YOU will get a present! :)

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Doing the Important Stuff

In “First Things First”, the follow-up to Steven Covey’s best-selling self-improvement and motivation book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, he illustrates a highly effective system of time management that can benefit any leader or manager. Covey’s Quadrant method of time management has been adopted throughout the business world: in team building, project management, business meetings, leadership training and seminars to ensure you focus on doing the important stuff.

What Covey has named his Quadrants system is based on the theory that most of us are driven by a consuming sense of urgency. He instructs us to divide all our priorities into the following four quadrants:

Quadrant 1: Important and Urgent – Items in this category are integral to your success and require your immediate attention. They include: situations such as crises, emergencies, appointments, projects that have deadlines, and other pressing problems.

Quadrant 2: Important but Not Urgent – Items in this category are integral to your success but don’t require your immediate attention right now. They include: leadership activities like planning and preparing, preventing future problems, coaching and mentoring staff, building and developing relationships with others, considering new possibilities and opportunities, and balancing activities such as spending time with loved ones, or having fun and creative pursuits.

Quadrant 3: Not Important but Urgent – Items in this category are not integral to your life, but they do demand your immediate attention. They include things that appear pressing on the surface (such as answering an insistent ringing phone or email), but probably don’t have any drastic consequences or repercussions for your success, or that may be able to be done by others or in a different way (someone could take a phone message for example).

Quadrant 4: Not Important and Not Urgent – Items in this category are not integral to your success and don’t need to happen at any particular time (or sometimes at all, for that matter), yet doing them can consume your time and energy. They include: routines, distractions and diversions, time-wasters, and other things you can generally do well without, although sometimes they include things we just like doing that aren’t necessary or important.

What Covey says next about these Quadrants may surprise you.

He warns that the common tendency is for people to get wrapped up in Quadrant 1 & 3 tasks because of their sense of urgency. This typically happens at the expense of the much more important Quadrant 2, which contains many life-enriching and important tasks.

The focus on tasks in Quadrants 1 and 3 is bolstered by the influence of other people’s demands and forces outside yourself, including the impetus of time. Accomplishing urgent tasks in Quadrants 1 & 3 gives us a comforting sense of progress. At least we have achieved something (even if it wasn’t particularly important).

Tasks in Quadrant 4 are what we do to anesthetize ourselves to the stressful effects of an imbalanced concentration of our energy on urgent matters. We often hide in Quadrant 4 tasks, and use them to procrastinate about doing something else, like the more important (and sometimes more difficult) Quadrant 2 tasks.

The paradox is that by spending more time deliberately doing Quadrant 2 tasks, we can avoid many of the crises that fall into the important and urgent tasks of Quadrant 1 and delegate many of the Quadrant 3 and 4 tasks that still need to be done. This frees our time up to focus even more on the leadership tasks in Quadrant 2.

Quadrant 2 is where our true and lasting happiness and our most productive effectiveness resides.

The sorts of tasks that fall into Quadrant 2 are often the ones that we are most likely to procrastinate about or just feel we don’t have time for. But they can be the most important in the longer-term to get your creative juices flowing and achieve significant success.

In addition to the possibilities listed above, Quadrant 2 tasks also include: reading and expanding your mind, developing new skills and abilities, getting physical exercise, engaging in recreation and leisurely activities, devising and implementing systems, preventative activities, and envisioning and shaping your future.

Giving more attention to Quadrant 2 activities will make us more readily able to tackle Quadrant 1 and 3 tasks with ease and efficiency.

Where are you spending your time? Stop for a moment and think about whether you have got the balance right (a Quadrant 2 task) or whether you are letting urgency rule your life.

See QUOTES on ‘Doing the Important Stuff’ below.

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If you ever procrastinate when you should be focussed on ‘Doing the Important Stuff’ you need to read ‘101 Tips for Avoiding Procrastination’. In this 60 page guide you’ll learn all the tricks, methods, and strategies for beating your procrastination habit.

Order now and receive these FREE bonuses:

* Time Management and
* The 3 Most Powerful Ways to Get Yourself to Achieve ANYTHING Despite Pressure, Deadlines and Procrastination

PLUS: – to celebrate my birthday enter this Secret Code: BIRTHDAY-SPECIAL
in Step 2 when you order to save $9 off the cost of this product. Normally ‘101 Tips for Avoiding Procrastination’ is only $17 but for the next few days you can use this Secret Code to pay only $8! (plus GST if you are based in Australia)

That’s more than 50% off the full purchase price and a fantastic bargain! For less than you might pay for lunch you could be well on your way to kicking the procrastination habit and reaping the success you deserve.

More details at:
http://HowLeadersGetThingsDone.com/avoid-procrastination.html

But ignore the price on that page because you are getting a special price. When you get to Step 2 of the order process just enter your Secret Code: BIRTHDAY-SPECIAL and the price will be automatically reduced especially for you.

This Secret Code is only valid up until my birthday on November 25th, after which the regular price will apply. So don’t procrastinate! Order now and start reaping the rewards today.

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TWO QUOTES OF NOTE:

“I’ve been on a calendar, but never on time.”

Marilyn Monroe

“This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we know what to do with it.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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BOOKS WORTH READING –

First Things First
by Steven Covey

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
by Stephen R. Covey